Question: Did Tainui Sign The Treaty Of Waitangi?

What is Ngai Tahu?

Ngāi Tahu, or Kāi Tahu, is the principal Māori iwi (tribe) of the South Island.

Its takiwā (tribal area) is the largest in New Zealand, and extends from the White Bluffs / Te Parinui o Whiti (southeast of Blenheim), Mount Mahanga and Kahurangi Point in the north to Stewart Island in the south..

Is the Treaty of Waitangi important today?

The Treaty of Waitangi is New Zealand’s founding document. The principles of the Treaty are referred to in several Acts of Parliament. It is an important part of the New Zealand education system and how New Zealanders work. Applying the Treaty influences life in New Zealand in many ways.

What would’ve happened if the Treaty of Waitangi was not signed?

Quite probably, Maori would have left Waitangi, the Treaty would not have been signed, and Hobson would have returned to Britain empty-handed. … And fourth, British colonisation would have proceeded over those areas where British settlers were resident, with Maori retaining their autonomy in other areas.

Is the Treaty of Waitangi fair?

Colonists believed the Treaty of Waitangi was fair because it offered Māori the rights of British citizens. The signing of the Treaty made it easier for settlers to acquire land. … Pākehā took sides with Māori and were known as ‘philo-Māori’ or Pākehā–Māori.

How do you honor the Treaty of Waitangi?

Honoring the Treaty can be as simple as supporting treaty education in schools, reading and improving knowledge of nz history, learning te reo or simply making a genuine attempt to say māori names correctly.

When were the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi developed?

1989Treaty principles developed by the Crown In 1989 the fourth Labour government became the first New Zealand government to set out principles to guide its actions on matters relating to the treaty. These principles were: the government has the right to govern and make laws.

Did Ngai Tahu sign the Treaty of Waitangi?

Many Ngāi Tahu women married whalers, and the tribe was no stranger to European ways. When seven high-ranking southern chiefs signed the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, it was seen as a convenient arrangement between equals. … Ngāi Tahu made its first claim against the Crown for breach of contract in 1849.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

What really happened at the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty of Waitangi is an agreement made in 1840 between representatives of the British Crown and more than 500 Māori chiefs. It resulted in the declaration of British sovereignty over New Zealand by Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson in May 1840. Most chiefs signed a Māori-language version of the treaty.

How much land does Ngai Tahu own?

Our rural developments consist of 52,000 hectares of rural land in Canterbury and the West Coast of the South Island.

What were the effects of the Treaty of Waitangi?

Many Europeans had no understanding of the concept of ownership of the land by the tribe. Māori also gradually realised that they were not free to sell their land to anyone, and that under the terms of the Treaty they could only sell to the government, and not to anyone else if the government did not want to buy it.

Who signed the Treaty of Waitangi?

6 February 1840 More than 40 Māori chiefs signed a treaty with the British Crown in the Bay of Islands.

How many signed the Treaty of Waitangi?

40 chiefsAbout 40 chiefs signed the Treaty of Waitangi on 6 February 1840. By the end of the year, about 500 other Māori, including 13 women, had put their names or moko to the document; all but 39 signed the Māori text.

What does Ngai Tahu own?

Ngāi Tahu Tourism is the parent company for a selection of iconic tourism businesses specialising in the outdoors. These include Shotover Jet, Franz Josef Glacier Guides and the Hollyford Track, leading experiences that are well known overseas and a must-do for many visitors.

Is the Treaty of Waitangi still valid today?

The Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 and was an agreement between the British Crown and a large number of Māori chiefs. Today the Treaty is widely accepted to be a constitutional document that establishes and guides the relationship between the Crown in New Zealand (embodied by our government) and Māori.

What does Article 3 of the Treaty of Waitangi mean?

Treaty of Waitangi (3) Article 3. This is the arrangement for the consent to the governorship of the Queen. The Queen will protect all the Māori people of New Zealand, and give them all the same rights as those of the people of England.

Who refused the Treaty of Waitangi?

Altogether, over 500 chiefs had signed. Hobson sent the British government copies of the Treaty in Māori and English. Hobson did not have the signatures of every Māori leader in the country. While some had refused to sign, others hadn’t even had the chance – the Treaty hadn’t been taken to their region.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi agree to?

In the English version, Māori cede the sovereignty of New Zealand to Britain; Māori give the Crown an exclusive right to buy lands they wish to sell, and, in return, are guaranteed full rights of ownership of their lands, forests, fisheries and other possessions; and Māori are given the rights and privileges of British …