Question: What Do They Eat On Waitangi Day?

What has Waitangi Day become to some people since the 1970’s?

The Waitangi Day Act 1960 declared 6 February to be Waitangi Day; a national day of thanksgiving in commemoration of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi.

Waitangi Day, a public holiday from 1974, briefly became New Zealand Day in the 1970s.

Increasingly, it became a focus for Māori protest activities..

How far is Waitangi from Auckland?

186 kmThe distance between Auckland and Waitangi is 186 km.

What do you do on Waitangi Day?

How to celebrate Waitangi DayGo to a Waitangi Day ceremony or event.Start tracing your whakapapa or family history.Take the family along to your local library or museum to find out more about New Zealand’s history.Read the Treaty of Waitangi and our comprehensive reference guide to the Treaty.Explore New Zealand’s history.More items…

What does Waitangi mean?

There are several possible meanings for ‘Waitangi’ – it literally translates as ‘noisy or weeping water. ‘ Reed’s Place Names of New Zealand notes that the literal meaning of the Waitangi in the Bay of Islands may refer to the noise of Haruru Falls at the mouth of the Waitangi River.

What Waitangi Day means to me?

Waitangi Day means to me, it kind of brings everyone together, Maori and non-Maori, and we get to share our [Maori] culture. … It’s a day that Maori get to celebrate their culture . . . it’s a time we lose our negative names and get to shine on the positive bits of our culture.

How did Waitangi get its name?

The Treaty in brief The Treaty of Waitangi is New Zealand’s founding document. It takes its name from the place in the Bay of Islands where it was first signed, on 6 February 1840. The Treaty is an agreement, in Māori and English, that was made between the British Crown and about 540 Māori rangatira (chiefs).

Is the Treaty of Waitangi important today?

The Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 and was an agreement between the British Crown and a large number of Māori chiefs. Today the Treaty is widely accepted to be a constitutional document that establishes and guides the relationship between the Crown in New Zealand (embodied by our government) and Māori.

What are the main points of the Treaty of Waitangi?

Treaty of WaitangiThe Waitangi Sheet of the Treaty of WaitangiContextTreaty to establish a British Governor of New Zealand, consider Māori ownership of their lands and other properties, and give Māori the rights of British subjects.Signed6 February 18406 more rows

How do you say Happy Waitangi Day in te reo?

E nga mana, e nga reo, e rau rangatira ma, tena koutou, tena koutou, tena koutou katoa.

What is traditional Kiwi food?

Popular seafoods include mussels, pipis, tuatua, bluff oysters, kina, paua and if you venture up river ‘Whitebait’ is considered a delicacy often made into ‘Whitebait Fritters’. A classic kiwi meal is ‘Fish ‘n’ Chips’ where fresh fish is deep-fried in batter accompanied with hot fries and served wrapped in newspaper.

Why is Waitangi Day so important?

Waitangi Day (Māori: Te Rā o Waitangi), the national day of New Zealand, marks the anniversary of the initial signing – on 6 February 1840 – of the Treaty of Waitangi, which is regarded as the founding document of the nation. … Ceremonies take place at Waitangi and elsewhere to commemorate the signing of the treaty.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

Who was against the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty of Waitangi is an agreement made in 1840 between representatives of the British Crown and more than 500 Māori chiefs. It resulted in the declaration of British sovereignty over New Zealand by Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson in May 1840. Most chiefs signed a Māori-language version of the treaty.

Which Chiefs did not sign the Treaty of Waitangi?

Tāraia Ngākuti, a chief of Ngāti Tamaterā in the Coromandel, was one of many notable chiefs who refused to sign the Treaty of Waitangi. Tāraia was a famous warrior and may have felt that signing would be beneath him.

What food is eaten on Waitangi Day?

WAITANGI DAY KI OKAHU There will be food stalls aplenty serving up kai Māori (hāngī, kaimoana, fry bread), plus sausage sizzles, burgers and barbecue, among other delicacies.

What happened Waitangi Day 1840?

Every year on 6 February, New Zealand marks the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840. In that year, representatives of the British Crown and over 500 Māori chiefs signed what is often considered to be New Zealand’s founding document.

While you’re in New Zealand, seek out a couple of the following quintessential Kiwi foods.Seafood. With more than 14,000 kilometres of coastline, New Zealand is home to some amazing seafood. … Roast lamb. … Māori hāngī … Fish and chips. … Cheese and wine. … Barbeque. … New Zealand desserts. … New Zealand lollies (sweets and candies)

How do you pronounce Waitangi?

waitangi Pronunciation. wai·t·an·gi.

What the Treaty of Waitangi says?

In the English version, Māori cede the sovereignty of New Zealand to Britain; Māori give the Crown an exclusive right to buy lands they wish to sell, and, in return, are guaranteed full rights of ownership of their lands, forests, fisheries and other possessions; and Māori are given the rights and privileges of British …

What is New Zealand’s national fruit?

KiwiThe national fruit of New Zealand is no ordinary fruit. The vibrant green flesh specked with little black seeds and covered with hairy peel, Kiwi is packed with healthy goodness!

What is New Zealand’s national animal?

kiwiThe kiwi is a unique and curious bird: it cannot fly, has loose, hair-like feathers, strong legs and no tail. Learn more about the kiwi, the national icon of New Zealand and unofficial national emblem.

Where in NZ is Waitangi?

Bay of IslandsWaitangi (/waɪˈtæŋi/ or /ˈwaɪtəŋi/, Māori: [ˈwaitaŋi]) is a locality in the Bay of Islands on the North Island of New Zealand. It is close to the town of Paihia (of which it is considered a part), 60 kilometres north of Whangarei. “Waitangi” is a Māori-language name meaning “weeping waters”.

Why did Māori want a treaty with the British?

Most signed a Māori-language version. Reasons why chiefs signed the treaty included wanting controls on sales of Māori land to Europeans, and on European settlers. They also wanted to trade with Europeans, and believed the new relationship with Britain would stop fighting between tribes.

What was NZ like in 1840?

1840 is considered a watershed year in the history of New Zealand: The Treaty of Waitangi is signed, British sovereignty over New Zealand is proclaimed, organised European settlement begins, and Auckland and Wellington are both founded.