Question: What Is The Difference Between Pepeha And Whakapapa?

What does Whakapapa mean in English?

Whakapapa is the core of traditional mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge).

Whakapapa means genealogy.

Other Māori terms for genealogy are kāwai and tātai.

Kauwhau and taki refer to the process of tracing genealogies..

What does Tangata whenua mean?

people of the landIn New Zealand, tangata whenua (Māori pronunciation: [ˈtaŋata ˈfɛnʉ. a]) is a Māori term that literally means “people of the land”.

What is Manaakitanga mean?

Manaakitanga is a Maori word that loosely translates to ‘hospitality’ – it is central to Maori society and inspires the way that travellers are made to feel welcome when visiting New Zealand. In Maori culture, manaakitanga is a traditional value that is considered to be hugely important.

Why is Whakapapa important?

Whakapapa is important to us as it connects us with our tūpuna, whānau, whenua, iwi and marae. … As the core of mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge), our whakapapa provides us with identity and history, and connects us with our tūpuna and the whenua.

What is HAPU mean?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. In Māori and New Zealand English, a hapū (“subtribe”, or “clan”) functions as “the basic political unit within Māori society”.

What does AWA mean in English?

Here is awa meaning in English: river. stream. canal. ditch.

What is a Tauparapara?

A tauparapara (or a karakia) This is a chant that usually refers to the tribal ancestry of the speaker or the dead one, and draws upon mythology still familiar or long since lost.

What is hapū and iwi?

The largest political grouping in pre-European Māori society was the iwi (tribe). This usually consisted of several related hapū (clans or descent groups). The hapū of an iwi might sometimes fight each other, but would unite to defend tribal territory against other tribes.

What does Nga mihi mean?

Greetings to allNga mihi nui! It’s Maori Language Week. … Here’s my mihi in te reo. The English translation is : Greetings to all.

How is Whakapapa used?

“Whakapapa” is to place in layers, lay one upon another. Hence the term Whakapapa is used to describe both the recitation in proper order of genealogies, and also to name the genealogies. The visualisation is of building layer by layer upon the past towards the present, and on into the future.

What is the meaning of Pepeha?

a way of introducing yourself in MāoriPepeha is a way of introducing yourself in Māori. It tells people who you are by sharing your connections with the people and places that are important to you.

What is the difference between a Pepeha and a mihi?

A mihi is a greeting while a pepeha is a form of introduction that establishes identity and heritage. In formal settings, the pepeha forms part of an individual’s mihi. A group situation where everyone gives their mihi (including their pepeha) is called a mihimihi.

Why is the head Tapu?

Tapu can be interpreted as “sacred” but also “not ordinary”, “special” or even forbidden. It is one of the strongest forces in Māori culture. … That’s why you should avoid sitting on pillows and touching or passing food over a person’s head, since it’s considered very sacred by Māori people.

What is a mihi Whakatau?

Mihi whakatau is the Māori term used to describe a formal speech of welcome and is undertaken by a Māori representative of the University. Mihi whakatau is traditionally used for welcoming, introductions, openings and general purpose which take place off the marae.

What is your Whakapapa?

Whakapapa. While whakapapa is about the recitation of genealogy – lineage or ancestry – it also literally means to ‘place in layers’ or ‘create a base’. It places our people in a wider context, linking us to a common ancestor, our ancestral land, our waterways and our tribal (and sub-tribal) groupings.